All About Website Name Registration and Web Hosting 

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All websites typically have a name – just like we are called hostingraja.in – This is a name that points to space on the web where your website is physically located. Your website will have an address that will be in the form of an IP address and it looks like this 205.11.109.64’ An IP address is a unique address for your website location.

When you buy a domain name from a web hosting company it can be easier to let the web host handle everything associated with the website. You just need to tell them the domain name of your choice and if the domain name will be available, they will set up your web hosting space so that when people do search for it, it will automatically be directed to your website. You can register with Hosting Raja’s services to buy a domain name and taking hosting services too. You will be Hosted Automatically if you order a domain name from Hosting Raja.

Now, here we will explain the different types of hosting packages that you can take from your service.

Different kinds of web hosting:

Now, let’s have a look at the different types of web hosting plans available in the market.

  1. Free Web Hosting

 Free web hosting is a good option for those who are just beginners or have a small website, but normally there would have a banner ad at the top of every page and all the money earned through will go to your web hosting company. Some free accounts let you use your domain name (free virtual hosting) and with some, your website address is a subdomain of the free hosting company (www.yoursitename.anydomainname.com). This second type is called Free Sub-domain hosting.

If you answer yes to all of the questions mentioned, then free … Read the rest

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IT Service Management Tools For a Seamless Business Ecosystem

The technologically enabled business world handles most of the data in digital formats and uses a network system to transfer the data to various locations and end users. However, in face of the aggressive competition, enterprises invest in upgraded infrastructure, which furthers their challenges into delivering quality IT services aligned to business goals. The enterprises also need to ensure service efficiency within budget limitations and maximum return-on-investment with the ability to synchronize people, process and technology.

These challenges have however, taken the enterprises on a route to manage their IT services along the lines of business necessity. For the global enterprises, managing an efficient IT system across the wide network is a big task. Hence, business enterprises depend on IT service providers to manage this with the help of effective IT service management tools.

IT service management is a discipline for managing information technology systems, centered around the customer’s perspective of IT’s contribution to the business and provides a workflow based configurable global platform for implementing ITSM processes across multiple organizations and geographic locations. The IT service management software being a web-based one provides enterprises with numerous ITSM tools through a single solution and includes service request, incident management, and problem and change management. Nevertheless, this being an anywhere-anytime solution, the IT Service Management tools are available as built-in application for the software development lifecycle.

The leading service providers offer solutions with world class IT service management tools with features such as a web-architected framework accessible through the internet browsers and multiple input methods such as word documents, emails, web portals or through any third party tools synchronized in real-time mode. Such single solution with all the required built-in applications for ITSM provides both small and medium enterprise as well as large business houses with great advantage.

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Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of… Read the rest Read More →

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Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of… Read the rest Read More →